ARHAP link updates

The International Religion Health Assets Program (IRHAP), formerly the African Religious Health Assets Programme (ARHAP), based at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, has published a wealth of free online materials related to academic faith-based intersections with health activities. Scholars and practitioners in the consortium have had a voice across global health, medicine, and international aid efforts, from the World Health Organization to the Lancet, and into villages, cities, and communities across the English-speaking world. Below are the most recent links to just a few of these publications. Some of these are also available on Professor James Cochrane’s Academia.edu page.

ARHAP Bibliography: Working in a Bounded Field of Unknowing (2006)
UPDATED LINK:
http://www.academia.edu/665959/African_Religious_Health_Assets_Programme

ARHAP Literature Review: Working in a Bounded Field of Unknowing (2006)
UPDATED LINK:
http://jliflc.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/arhaplitreview_oct2006.pdf

The Contribution of Religious Entities to Health in Sub-Saharan Africa (Gates Foundation report, 2008)
UPDATED LINK:
http://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu/publications/contribution-of-religious-entities-to-health-in-sub-saharan-africa

In Search of Common Ground for Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Communication: Mapping the Cultural Politics of Religion and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa, PhD thesis of Jill Olivier, Department of Religious Studies, University of Cape Town, February 2010.
UPDATED LINK:
http://uctscholar.uct.ac.za/PDF/10565_Olivier_J.pdf

Taking Religion Seriously: Some Thoughts on ‘Respectful Dialogue’ Between Religion and Public Health in Africa (2007)
UPDATED LINK: https://www.academia.edu/665933/Caring_for_the_Canary_Religion_and_the_Political_Economy_of_Health

Worlds Apart? Religious Interpretations and Witchcraft in the Negotiations of Health Strategies for HIV/AIDS in South Africa, by Joanne Wreford (2009)
UPDATED LINK:
http://www.cssr.uct.ac.za/sites/cssr.uct.ac.za/files/pubs/WP262.pdf

Learn more about religious health assets in Chapter 5 of Beholden: Religion, Global Health, and Human Rights.

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